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“More Is Less … Or Is It?” and the Common Core Math Standards

Second Grade

Geometry

Reason with shapes and their attributes.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.G.A.1

Recognize and draw shapes having specified attributes, such as a given number of angles or a given number of equal faces.1 Identify triangles, quadrilaterals, pentagons, hexagons, and cubes.

(Application & Synthesis Level-Students could illustrate what Quadruped, Pentagazeand Octigoon(Ch. 2) might look like after learning about the basic shapes and their attributes.

 

More Is Less … Or Is It?” and the Common Core Standards for Reading: Literature

Second Grade

Key Ideas and Details:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.2.1

Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and howto demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.2.3

Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges.

Craft and Structure:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.2.5

Describe the overall structure of a story, including describing how the beginning introduces the story and the ending concludes the action.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.2.6

Acknowledge differences in the points of view of characters, including by speaking in a different voice for each character when reading dialogue aloud.

(Using Norma Gentner’s copyrighted script based on the events in Chapter 1 of her book, choose different students to play Bradley Bratstone, Tommy Small, Joey, Sam or the Bus Driver, then reverse roles. Have name cards with yarn around each so they can trade places and experience another character’s point of view.)

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.2.7

Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting, or plot.

(Compare the UnitPrice Label amount of the “smaller” 12 oz. box at the beginning to the UPL amount when they’re on sale. Does Tommy get “more for less” when they’re on sale?)

 

“More Is Less … Or Is It?” and the Common Core Math Standards

Third Grade

Number & Operations in Base Ten

Use place value understanding and properties of operations to perform multi-digit arithmetic.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.3.NBT.A.3

Multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 (e.g., 9 × 80, 5 × 60) using strategies based on place value and properties of operations.

(Tommy’s Math –p.57)

He multiplied $.20 per ounce times 16. Using his shortcut, he doubled the 16, added a zero to the 32, which resulted in $3.20 per pound.2 x 16 = 32, add a 0 = $3.20 per pound

Number & Operations -Fractions

Develop understanding of fractions as numbers.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.3.NF.A.1

Understand a fraction 1/bas the quantity formed by 1 part when a whole is partitioned into bequal parts; understand a fraction a/bas the quantity formed by aparts of size 1/b.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.3.NF.A.3

Explain equivalence of fractions in special cases, and compare fractions by reasoning about their size.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.3.NF.A.3.B

Recognize and generate simple equivalent fractions, e.g., 1/2 = 2/4, 4/6 = 2/3. Explain why the fractions are equivalent, e.g., by using a visual fraction model.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.3.NF.A.3.C

Express whole numbers as fractions, and recognize fractions that are equivalent to whole numbers. Examples: Express 3 in the form 3 = 3/1; recognize that 6/1 = 6; locate 4/4 and 1 at the same point of a number line diagram.

(The above 4 Content Standards can be addressed using the worksheet with Cup 1 and Cup 2.The activity is not only concrete using different cereals and measuring cups, but abstract as well when the students write the fractions of 1/4, 2/4, 3/4, 4/4…1/2, 2/2 on their worksheet.)

 

More Is Less … Or Is It?” and the Common Core Standards for Reading: Literature

Third Grade

Key Ideas and Details:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.3.1

Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

(Create Question Cubes for student groups or pairs—Moving towards Higher Level Thinking)

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.3.3

Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events).

Craft and Structure:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.3.4

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

(Using the chart below, students go back to the text and reference the literal phrase in the left-hand column. They sketch the literal meaning in the first box. Next, they write what the author meant in a sentence in the middle box. In the box on the right, they draw or write about a time when this phrase connected to their life experiences.)

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.3.5

Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections.

Print the Storyboard below on sheets of 12 x 18 paper. Have the students respond with sketches to changes in Tommy, the main character, as he moves through the chapters.)

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.3.6

Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters.

(Using Norma Gentner’scopyrighted script based on the events in Chapter 1 of her book, choose different students to play Bradley Bratstone, Tommy Small, Joey, Sam or the Bus Driver, then reverse roles. Have name cards with yarn around each so they can trade places and experience another character’s point of view.)

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.3.7

Explain how specific aspects of a text’s illustrations contribute to what is conveyed by the words in a story (e.g., create mood, emphasize aspects of a character or setting)

(Compare the Unit Price Label amount of the “smaller” 12 oz. box at the beginning to the UPLamount when they’re on sale. Does Tommy get “more for less” when they’re on sale?)

 

“More Is Less … Or Is It?” and the Common Core Math Standards

Fourth Grade

Number & Operations in Base Ten

Generalize place value understanding for multi-digit whole numbers.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.4.NBT.A.3

Use place value understanding to round multi-digit whole numbers to any place.

(Tommy’s Math –p.57)

Seeing the relationship between numbers really helped Tommy with his mental Calculations. He couldn’t divide $5.00 by 24 very easily in his head, but 24 is close to the Number 25. He knew there are four 25s, or quarters, in a dollar, and there are five $1.00sIn $5.00.

Number & Operations -Fractions

Build fractions from unit fractions.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.4.NF.B.3.A

Understand addition and subtraction of fractions as joining and separating parts referring to the same whole.

(Tommy’s adding of 2 servings: 3/4 + 3/4= 6/4 in Chapter 5, pg. 20.Also refer to the author-created Cosmos CrunchNutritional Label)

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.4.NF.B.3.C

Add and subtract mixed numbers with like denominators, e.g., by replacing each mixed number with an equivalent fraction, and/or by using properties of operations and the relationship between addition and subtraction.

1 ½ cups or 6/4 (2 servings) + ¾ cup (1 serving) + 1 ½ cups or 6/4 (2 servings) + ¾ cup (1serving) = 6 servings

Color ¾ of the first cup blue, and write a #1 (serving). Color the top ¼ of that cup, and the bottom 2/4 of the second cup orange. Write #2 (servings). Color the top 2/4 of the second cup green, and the bottom ¼ of the third cup green as well. Write #3 (servings). Continue on until the students record the 6 servings that Tommy ate in one day.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.4.NF.B.3.D

Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions referring to the same whole and having like denominators, e.g., by using visual fraction models and equations to represent the problem.

(Tommy’s Plan –Chapter 5, p.20)

‘If he ate one bowl at breakfast, that would be two servings. He could take one serving to school for a snack. He’d have another snack after school, and eat one more bowl before bedtime. So, if his calculations were right, he could eat six servings per day! At that rate, he could vaporize the contents of the box, all 18 servings, in three days.’

 

More Is Less … Or Is It?” and the Common Core Standards for Reading: Literature

Fourth Grade

Key Ideas and Details:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.4.1

Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

(Create Question Cubes for student groups or pairs—Moving towards Higher Level Thinking)

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.4.2

Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.4.3

Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions).

Craft and Structure:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.4.5

Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems (e.g., verse, rhythm, meter) and drama (e.g., casts of characters, settings, descriptions, dialogue, stage directions) when writing or speaking about a text.

(Compare the structure of the original text to the text in script form using the chart below.)

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.4.7

Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the text.